Cinematic Chromatics: Color Palettes in Famous Films

It’s family film night in our home this evening. We’re watching Walt Disney’s 1940 masterpiece, Fantasia. The movie is a feast for the eyes, ears, and mind. Watching the action, I’m fascinated by stunning use of color. As such, I’ve been searching for more information about other films and their respective cinematic chromatic catalogues. Here are a few intriguing resources I’ve uncovered:

Well, the Weather Outside is Frightful…

The temperature’s dropping. It’s cold out there and it’s only going to get colder. Thank goodness we can all pull up a chair and gather around the Internet Fireplace. While we bask in the glow of the faux flames, we can review what the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Weather Service have to say about the importance of winter preparedness. Working together, we can be a Weather-Ready Nation.

A Blast From the Past: The Rocket Book

Drop by the Library of Congress and explore its Center for the Book site. Why? The site hosts quite a bit of exciting and free books that are sure to please readers of all ages. Need proof? If so, flip through The Rocket Book (1912) by Peter Sheaf Hersey Newell. Delightful verse and humorous images propel eager readers through a madcap story that as fresh now as it was when it first appeared 102 years ago.

Image from The Rocket Book by American artist and author, Peter Newell (1862-1924). A naughty boy playing in a basement finds and ignites a rocket that blasts upward in an apartment building. In this image, a family meal is explosively upset as the rocket races ever upward.

The Steiners on the floor above
Of breakfast were partaking;
Crash! came the rocket, unannounced,
And set them all a-quaking!
It smote a catsup bottle, fair,
And bang! the thing exploded!
And now these people all declare
That catsup flask was loaded.

Related resources:



Old Book Illustrations, New Ideas

Old Book Illustration Blog

The images at Old Book Illustrations Scrapbook Blog are a treat to explore. Poring over this collection of vintage illustrations (mostly wood engravings/woodcuts, etchings or metal engravings) taken from books published between the 1700s through the early 1900s, is an exciting endeavor. One of my favorite pastimes is grabbing an illustration, dropping it into an image-editing program and overlaying colors.