On a Tear

Tired of threaded discussions? Have a ripping good time obliterating a curtain of digital fabric instead. CodePen’s Tearable Cloth is anything but terrible.

Related resources:

 

Cinematic Chromatics: Color Palettes in Famous Films

It’s family film night in our home this evening. We’re watching Walt Disney’s 1940 masterpiece, Fantasia. The movie is a feast for the eyes, ears, and mind. Watching the action, I’m fascinated by stunning use of color. As such, I’ve been searching for more information about other films and their respective cinematic chromatic catalogues. Here are a few intriguing resources I’ve uncovered:

Arise, Awake

Winter holidays are great. We get a chance to stay up late and sleep in for a few days. It’s decadent, a thoroughly guilty pleasure. The only problem with this kind of arrangement is that we enjoy our sleepfest too much. We indulge just long enough to get out of the habit of waking up when we normally would. Later, when we have to return to our workaday schedule, sloughing off slumber is all the more difficult. Alarm clocks help. Even so, a little bit of assistance in the form of a bedtime calculator is extremely prudent. Here are a few resources designed to help the most determined dozers disembark from a cruise through Dreamland:

Just for fun:

Happy Birthday, Mr. Miyazaki

Hayao Miyazaki

Today, Hayao Miyazaki, director, animator extraordinaire, and beloved guardian of imagination, celebrates 72 years of making the world a happier place. His works and the colorful characters that populate them are absolutely endearing. Watching a Miyazaki movie is like being allowed to step outside of (if only briefly) the chaotic reality where we usually reside. Our respite takes us to an alternate universe where beauty reigns supreme. During our visit in Miyazaki’s constructed world, we generally meet a strong female protagonist and explore themes such as the wonder of flight, the importance of nature, and the transition from childhood to maturity, and the power of kindness.

Miyazaki’s stunning works of cinematic art include:

Happy Birthday, Mr. Miyazaki!

Note: The image used in this post was a derivative of the original photograph composed by Natasha Baucas on July 28, 2009 at the San Diego Comic-Con.