Cloudy With a Chance of Data

Image of raindrops on a window photographed by Flickr user daBinsi on May 2, 2008.

Here in Statesboro, there have been days and days of fog, mist, and rain.

Ugh.

While I’m waiting for sunshine to return, I suppose I’ll just inundate my brain with a flood of information from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)’s rushing, rousing, and rippling Rainfall Resources.

Related Resources:

Ice Follies: The South Georgia Freeze

My mailbox, covered in ice from the ice stormWell, thanks to yesterday’s meteorological mayhem–very low temperatures, precipitation coating weak pine limbs and ice! ice! ice!–I didn’t get to post.

I live in Statesboro, Georgia, a location that rarely gets snow or ice. I’m thankful for that. Although my city isn’t experiencing weather-related upheavals like other, far colder places around the country, what my city did endure on Monday was rather unpleasant. Pine trees laden with ice began sloughing off their weakest branches. Amid cracking sounds that were similar to gunfire noise, limbs fell from tall trees damaging house. Our house lost a window to one of the plummeting pine bombs and our wood fence was smashed in a couple of places.

All in all, though, it was remarkably tolerable.

Sure, I’ll be cleaning up pine limbs for weeks; however, doing that beats dealing with week-long power outages, months of shoveling snow, and permafrost.

Related Links:

Storm Info is Only a Heartbeat Away: Stormpulse

Do you teach concepts related to weather? Are your students interested in hurricanes? If so, read on.

I know I should have posted this resource for Science teachers earlier but I’ve been all but swept away in a deluge of email and other administrivia. Anyone interested in meteorology or hurricane-related information will want to explore Stormpulse. For example, the site allows visitors to view hurricanes and hurricane seasons dating back to 1851! Simply enter the name of a prominent storm (like Katrina) in a URL such as: http://www.stormpulse.com/katrina or the year of a hurricane season such as http://www.stormpulse.com/1966. For more features guaranteed to blow you away, review all of Stormpulse’s cool features.